Comments (13)

  1. Breakthrough Initiatives :

    Apr 17, 2016 05:51john.hayden1@gmail.comPosted on: Breakthrough Initiatives
    "Moore's Law may not be the feature size limiter. Particle implantation damage becomes more serious to smaller geometry devices - already, at 55nm and below (16nm is state of the art), single particles can disrupt 4-8 adjacent SRAM cells in the friendly terrestrial environment - which requires interleaving and muxing of data words in the physical SRAM layout even with ECC.

    So: smaller feature size requires increasing redundancy, which increases area. At some point these may balance, i.e. reductions in features require bigger total survivable chip area."

    Answer:
    This is an excellent point. Smaller feature size may not be desirable for the electronics on the StarChip. Thankfully, we have quite a lot of area to work with on the sail. The nominal plan is to have many redundant copies of the electronics onboard. There may well be an optimal tradeoff between feature size and the number of instantiations of each electronic subsystem on the nanocraft.

    – Zac Manchester, Breakthrough Initiatives

  2. Breakthrough Initiatives :

    Apr 18, 2016 19:14Mitch FagenPosted on: Breakthrough Initiatives
    "What about the effect the acceleration might have on the electronic components and connections? I've read in news stories about this proposal that the acceleration is estimated to be approximately 60,000 g. Is it possible to make microchips, a motherboard, a camera, etc., that could survive such a force?"

    Answer:
    Thankfully solid-state electronics are extremely robust to large accelerations. In fact, the electronics in current “smart” artillery rounds routinely survive accelerations comparable to the 60,000 g envisioned for the nanocraft.

    – Zac Manchester, Breakthrough Initiatives

  3. michael.million@sky.com:

    Sensors have now been built that can survive 200 000 g, I think when this concept is up and running 60 000 g will be on the conservative side.

    http://www.memsic.com/accelerometers/MXC4005XC

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